WFO Blunders and Best Practices

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Have you ever been stood up by a survey?  Well, I have. Far too many times! One of my biggest pet peeves is when companies invite their callers to participate in a survey after a call, but then fail to survey callers that opted in. TIP: To avoid your callers from feeling stood up, use verbiage […]

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call avoidance

Call Avoidance 101

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In my experience, I’ve found that an agent is 10 times more likely to avoid calls towards the end of their shift.  If you’re a contact center leader, what measurements do you put in place to control and/or capture such behaviors?  Now don’t get me wrong, I know we have exceptional agents out there that […]

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Where’s the Proof?

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In the contact center industry, the guiding principal is typically, “If you can’t prove it, it didn’t happen”. Have you ever called into a customer service line for a second time for the same issue, only to discover there is no record of your first contact? How frustrating is that? It makes you question if contact center agents ever intentionally fail to update contact notes when they deliver less than stellar service. Sadly, the answer to the question is an astounding YES!

What system does your company use to ensure proper record of customer interactions? How much money is wasted per year as a result of repeat contacts that could be avoided through the “A” word, accountability? These are huge areas of concern associated with companies with agents handing customer interactions. Many companies integrate Customer Relationship Managers (CRMs) into their IVR and other communication channels to screen-pop accounts once customers are identified. In this process, many companies have implemented a tagging system to automatically post system account notes associating an agent to the customer contact with time, date, and agent ID upon contact routing. This system automatically records the agent name that has accessed the account – which introduces the concept of awareness and accountability. Agents that know their agent ID is systematically posted to an account are more likely to deliver a satisfying level of service than agents with the knowledge that they can’t be traced. Why is this? Well, in my humble opinion, it’s a matter of tolerance.

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When Bosses Go Knocking, Remote Agents Go Walking

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Editor’s Note: As we wrap up 2010, I wanted to share some of our favorite blog posts from the past year. We’ll be back with new content on January 4. This post by Nicole Burney first ran on August 30.

As more companies transition from a brick-and-mortar workforce to an at-home model, they are quickly realizing the transition does not come without challenges. Key components of this business transition that are often overlooked are the need to re-establish processes for coaching and development. This business transition requires structured change to support the needs of the new remote agent base — it requires a new approach in measuring the work that was once measured within the brick-and-mortar center. An effective remote transition can’t happen without proper planning.

Companies that have deployed this model have found themselves asking: Now that the agents are in their homes working, how do we coach them?  Some companies have tried to address the need for coaching by sending supervisors to the agents’ homes.  Would you be surprised to learn that these home visits were less than welcomed by agents? Read more >>

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